Mexico City Vacation Travel Guide | Expedia
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Mexico City Vacation Travel Guide | Expedia


Bienvenido a Mexico City, one of the financial powerhouses and cultural
capitals of Latin America. A place with ancient roots, in recent years this mega-city of 21 million
has undergone a renaissance, exploding into, a city of color! Mexico City’s color can be found on every
street. It’s in the sunbaked plazas and monuments, the dappled shade and quiet of its courtyards, and in the brushstrokes of its murals and
street art. It’s in the faded pastels and tile work
of colonial buildings, it’s in the cantinas,… the music,…the
cuisine,…everywhere there is color. If life has a color, that color would be called,
Mexico City! Despite its legendary sprawl, Mexico City isn’t hard to navigate. Just like the paint upon an artist’s palette, the city is divided into distinctive boroughs, all with their own shades and moods. Mexico City’s colors run deepest in the
main square, the Zócalo, once the epicenter of the Mexican
Civilization. When the Spanish arrived in 1521, the Aztec
temples were swiftly leveled, and a colonial city rose in its place. Today, this area is presided over by a temple of
a different kind, The Metropolitan Cathedral. Throughout the Centro Histórico district, over 1500 heritage buildings vie for your
attention. Visit San Ildefonso College and be introduced to the earliest masterpieces of Mexican muralism. Dive into a kaleidoscope of color and craft
at La Ciudadela, an artisanal market featuring over 300 stalls. Then admire the blue and white splendor of
Casa de Azulejos, The House of Tiles. The streets of this district overflow with
incredible museums and galleries, such as the Museo Biblioteca Palacio Postal, and the Palacio de Bellas Artes. For a
window into the life and color of yesteryear, visit the fabulous Museo Franz Mayer, a glittering display of cultural treasures
and everyday items that the tireless collector amassed throughout
his lifetime. When it’s time for a change of color, head to leafy avenues of Alameda Central. Discover even more shades of green at Chapultepec
Park, one of the largest urban parks in the world. As well as serving as the city’s lungs, the park is home to cultural institutions
such as the Auditorio Nacional, and the museum of anthropology, as well as the popular Chapultepec Zoo. Pay your respects to the Ninos Heroes. This monument honors the six boy soldiers who gave their lives defending Castillo de
Chapultepec, when it fell to the Americans in 1847. Today, the castle serves as the National Museum
of History, shining a light through the darkest, and brightest chapters, of Mexico’s history. Just to the north is upscale Polanco, and its neighbor Nuevo Polanco, a former warehouse area rapidly being transformed
by new architectural visions. Rising like shape-shifting plasma, the Museo Soumaya is filled with over 60,000
artworks from the private collection of billionaire, Carlos Slim. Displaying masterpieces from
across the ages, this free museum features European masters
such as Van Gogh, Dali and Rodin. The spirit of philanthropy continues just
across the road, at Museo Jumex, a building which echoes the
district’s industrial past, and which houses the largest private contemporary
art collection in Latin America. To the south of the city is the once ancient
village of Coyoacán, “the place of coyotes”. In the early 20th century this area flowered
into a place of bohemia; its artists, writers and intellectuals inspiring and enriching not only Mexico, but the entire world. Visit The Blue House, the birthplace of Frieda Kahlo. In neighboring San Angel, explore the museum, house and studio of Diego
Rivera and Frida Kahlo, where these two giants of Mexican art worked,. lived, and loved. Just to the south are the incredible murals
and buildings of Ciudad Universitaria, which when constructed in the 1950s, was the city’s largest single building project
since the time of the Aztecs. It is here, at the university’s Olympic
stadium, that you can see one of Rivera’s last epic
murals, a work he never lived to complete. The spirit of bohemia and creativity continues amid the sophisticated hues and beauty of
districts such, Roma and Condesa. At Xochimilco, simply float away on a riot
of color on the last of the city’s Aztec canals, exploring markets and gardens along the way. In Mexico City there is color everywhere, and once experienced, they will never fade. All you have to do is close your eyes, and you will see the many colors of Mexico
City again, today, tomorrow, always…

100 Comments

  • Herman Karsowidjojo

    Declaración Universal de los Derechos Humanos |

    https://youtu.be/uQt6NyaSkug

    ¡Bienvenido! Saludos !

  • Michael Jade

    You guys at Expedia make beautiful videos and we loved them. Thanks for bringing the cities of the world to us.

  • Kees Manuel

    Expedia congratulations. Beautiful video. Mexico looks great. My last vacation, enjoy my video: https://youtu.be/lzHFAnObLi0

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  • Carlos E. A. dos Santos

    México es un gran país que no se olvidó su origen, su identidad. Un día lo voy a conocer. Saludos desde Brasil!

  • R.B.R

    Me gusta la ciudad de Mexico, particularmente la parte centrica. Desafortunadamente tambien me inspira mucho temor ir solo.

  • World_Me M

    Beautiful Mexico City!, so much history and culture!.
    Mexico, the country has the largest number of ¨World heritage sites¨ in the Americas.

  • Eagledives

    Societies are a direct reflection of the people who live in
    and create them. Mexicans created Mexico. Mexico blows for one reason and one reason only. Mexico blows
    because it’s full of LOW STANDARDS, LOW MORALS life style Mexicans. Everywhere
    a Mexican goes in the world, he can only recreate the disaster that is Mexico. This is because this is what his culture has programmed
    him to do.

                                              
    Mexico
    posted its highest homicides on record, with a new government report showing
    murders in the country rose by 26 percent in the first half of 2018.

    The
    Interior Department said there were 15,973 homicides in the first half of the
    year, compared to 13,751 killings in the same period of 2017.

    The record-breaking homicides have surpassed the violence seen during the dark
    years of Mexico’s
    drug war in 2011, along with exceeding all government data since records began
    in 1997.

     
    At
    these crisis levels, the department’s homicide rate for the country stands around
    22 per 100,000 population for year-end estimates — near the level of Columbia
    24.2 and Guatemala
    26.0.

    Thanks
    to the Jalisco drug cartel, Mexico’s
    most dangerous state is Colima, on the central Pacific coast, which experienced
    a 27-percent increase in killings and now has a shocking homicide rate of about
    80 per 100,000

    Guanajuato,
    a central Mexican state, saw a 122 percent increase in homicides, which now has
    a rate of about 40 per 100,000. Government officials have reported that much of
    violent crime is linked to gangs of fuel thieves who drill taps into government
    pipelines

    The
    new President Andrés Manuel López Obrador is dealing with a population of Aztec
    descendants whose innate propensities gravitate toward the primitive savage,
    violent, filthy and deadly habits and customs. The populace of Mexico
    will revert to their base savage primitive instincts of their ancestors
    regardless of whatever First World
    policies are implemented. The concept of race is paramount when addressing any
    proposals of civilize governance. Of course, in this modern politically-correct
    age, this all-important thesis and heritage facts will be ignored in any
    proposition toward solving their social problems.

    80% of Mexico
    wants to come to America.
    If we let 90 million more Mexicans flood our heaving shores, America
    will become Mexico
    North by default.

    Mexico
    hands down is the most horrifically dark and corrupt country on the face of the
    earth. Try driving across the Yucatan
    or down the Pacific coast…The government preys on the people and has for 400
    years. They drive their poor slaves northward so that they can export their
    diseases and poverty to the US.
    They want the $26 Billion a year they send home.

    If our inefficient and corrupt government actually cared about Americans or the
    Mexican people they'd close the borders and deport all the illegals they could
    catch. The returning Mexicans (who are owed nothing by the US)
    would probably plunge the country of Mexico
    into political turmoil and unless that happens things there will remain pretty
    dark.

     

    Mexico
    apparently falls into the same foreign policy category as Saudi
      Arabia. Just as the State Department
    is willing to overlook the gross human rights abuses of King Salman in the
    interests of oil and “regional stability,” it is equally willing to give
    Mexico´s Enrique Peña Nieto the benefit of the doubt even in the face of
    mounting evidence of the repressive and corrupt tendencies of his government
    and his party

     

    The State
    Department’s most recent report on human rights in the world points the
    finger explicitly at China,
    Egypt,
    Eritrea,
    Ethiopia,
    Iran,
    Russia,
    Syria
    and even Saudi Arabia.
    Yet for Mexico,
    it goes out of its way to protect national elites by locating problems strictly
    at the local level and among narco-traffickers. The report
    also flat-out lies, stating that there were “no reports of political prisoners
    or detainees” and that the Mexican government “generally respected” freedom of
    speech and assembly.

     

    Today, Mexico
    is one of the most dangerous
    countries in the world, confirmed by the international press and news media,
    with frequent assassinations and threats against journalists, mass killings,
    savage public assasinations including women and children. For instance, on Feb
    8, Anabel
    Flores Salazar, a brave, 27-year-old crime and corruption reporter became
    the fifteenth journalist assassinated in the state of Veracruz
    during the five-year reign of Gov. Javier Duarte, a close ally of Peña Nieto.
    Over a dozen journalists have been killed in the line of duty throughout Mexico
    since Peña Nieto took office. According to the free press group Article
    19, the vast majority of these cases involve the direct participation of
    government officials.

     

    In addition
    to direct violence against journalists, government censorship of the media has
    increased. A long list of independent journalists are excluded from radio and
    television for their anti-government views and Mexico's leading radio news
    anchor, Carmen Aristegui, was arbitrarily fired, apparently on direct
    orders from the office of the president.

  • N Wilson

    And again, this place is a beautiful place in the planet. We'll coming soon to visit (Y) Thank you for the beautiful video.

  • Ayan Mazumdar

    My dream country……….which is in my heart for many years……. everything is so beautiful…..the art craft especially the bamboo hats of Mexico😍😍😍😍

  • Ines de Paula Naides

    Muy hermoso el México…me encanta es una hermana ciudad…me fascina su cultura su gente…yo amo los mexicanos. Saludos desde Brasil

  • Fightflix

    Could I use a short amount of your video footage for the intro of a video I am working on? Credit will be given of course. (It's a video I won't be making money out of as my channel is not monetized).

  • Consuelo Guzman

    We just came back from a trip and we are planning an coming back next year. We went with Turlandia an it's great they take you to many of those places, love it!

  • vanesa Rosales

    I really want to live in Mexico city. I am Mexican but because of the changes of life I was brought to the US by my parents but I love Mexico and hopefully I have the opportunity to find a job in Mexico city and live there for a while!

  • Nathan X.

    The city looks like shit. Mexico is disgusting, cities are not really cities more like huge towns and it’s dirty as fuck everywhere we went. Worst traveling experience in my entire life.

  • De U

    This is remarkably beautiful with so much heritage sites and nice modern buildings in the CBD. Definitely love Mexico city. From Nigeria.

  • Bertha Lovejoy

    Mexico city looks like a buzzing, jovial, city full of color and beautiful architecture unlike ugly, sprawling, concrete jungles that are American cities whose sacred buildings are McDonalds

  • Martin Kent

    Dans Mexico Ville, un grande nombre de parents ignorent les regles sur la circulation lorsque leurs enfants sont avec eux, et bon nombre de ces parents sont des fonctionnaires. Au Mexico, les jeunes meritent d'etre entoures de fonctionnaires responsables, consciencieux, respectueux des lois; leur avenir en depend. Si nous doublons les amendes routieres dans les capitales, nous verrons apparaitre des rues et des adultes respectueux de la loi, ce quon attend depuis longtemps, dans Mexico Ville. L'Organization Mondiale de la Sante, Bureau de Securite Routiere, estime que le respect des regles sur la circulation est souhaitable depuis longtemps au Mexico. Imaginer!

  • Francisco Corrales Morales

    Planning my trip to Mexico City !

    3:04 Those are sculptures by Jiménez Deredia. A Costa Rican artist. I didn't knew you guys in Mexico City had. Awesome

  • Marco Paulo Travel

    Mexico City is a true treasure. One of my favorite cities that I’ve visited while travel vlogging! Keep it up and keep exploring 🙌🏻

  • Sherlock Holmes90

    Mexico City is divided like this,
    the two cultural centres (downtown and Coyoacán)
    The millionaire centre (Polanco)
    Godinez centres (Santa fe and Reforma)
    The conservator centre(Chapultepec)
    The indígena centre (Xochimilco)
    Poor centres (Iztapalapa,Venustiano Carranza, Iztacalco ,Tepito ,etc)
    Chilling centres(Condesa and southern Roma)
    Futuristic centre (Alcaldía Benito Juárez)
    Hope u come to Mexico City one day!

  • Miguel G

    I highly recommend to visit the José Luis Cuevas museum close to El Zócalo. Amazing museum full of post muralist mexican art.

  • Miguel G

    I highly recommend to visit the José Luis Cuevas museum close to El Zócalo. Amazing museum full of post muralist mexican art.

  • ToddsTravelTips

    Really good video! I was there myself a couple of months ago and I actually made 3 videos in and around Mexico City! Nice to see all these places again and a few new ones!

  • luis humberto ruiz betanzos

    Mexico one of the financial powerhouses and cultural capital of Latin America.A place with ancient roots. In recent years this mega-city of 21 million has undergone a renaissance, explodig into, city of color.The color can be found on every street. It is in the sunbanked plazas and monuments.The dappled shade and quiet of its courtyards, and in the brushstrokes of its murals and street art.It is faded pastelsand tile work of colonial buildins, it is in the cantinas… the music, the cuisine,… everywhere there is color.If life has a color, that color would be called, Mexico City.Despite its legendary sprawl, Mexico city is not hard to navigate.Just like paint upon an artists palette, the city is divided into distinctive boroughs, all with their own shades and moods.

    Mexico city's colors run deep in the main square, the zocalo, once the epicenter of the Mexican civilization. When the spanish arrived in 1521, the Aztec temples were swiftly leveled, and a colonial city rose in its place. Today, this area is presided over by a temple of a different kind, The Metropolitan Cathedral. Throughout the Centro Historico distric, over 1500 heritage buildings vie for your attention. Visit San Ildelfonso College and be introduced to the earliest masterpieces of Mexican muralism. Dive into a kaleidoscope of color and craft at La Ciudadela, an artisanal market featuring over 300 stalls.

    México, una de las potencias financieras y capital cultural de América Latina. Un lugar con raíces antiguas. En los últimos años, esta megaciudad de 21 millones ha experimentado una ciudad de color renacentista y explosiva. El color se puede encontrar en cada calle. Está en las plazas y monumentos bañados por el sol. La sombra moteada y la tranquilidad de sus patios, y en las pinceladas de sus murales y arte callejero. Está desteñido de pasteles y azulejos de edificios coloniales, está en las cantinas … la música, la cocina, … en todas partes hay color. Si la vida tiene un color, ese color se llamaría Ciudad de México. A pesar de su expansión legendaria, la ciudad de México no es difícil de navegar. Al igual que la pintura sobre una paleta de artistas, la ciudad se divide en distritos distintivos, todos con sus propios tonos y estados de ánimo.

    Los colores de la ciudad de México son profundos en la plaza principal, el zócalo, alguna vez el epicentro de la civilización mexicana. Cuando los españoles llegaron en 1521, los templos aztecas se nivelaron rápidamente, y una ciudad colonial se levantó en su lugar. Hoy, esta área está presidida por un templo de un tipo diferente, la Catedral Metropolitana. En todo el distrito Centro Histórico, más de 1500 edificios patrimoniales compiten por su atención. Visite el Colegio San Ildelfonso y conozca las primeras obras maestras del muralismo mexicano. Sumérgete en un caleidoscopio de color y artesanía en La Ciudadela, un mercado artesanal con más de 300 puestos 2:42

  • maximilliano maxim

    Waw Mexico is one of the best cities 💙 in the whole world even better than new York 😉 saludos de Túnez ( yo hablo un poco de español )

  • juan alberto lopez leon

    Ame la canción de inicio México city es increíble y llena de color los mariachis en las calles demuestran una riqueza caminante por sus trajes que bello Saludos desde Perú 😊😎

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